Jim Trainer

Posts Tagged ‘bev haven’

Gone

In Uncategorized on December 13, 2013 at 10:38 am

I can tell, just one look in your eye
that it’s time
We may have spent our nights in hell
but it’s time
Here’s to all your love it got us nowhere
Here’s to hoping you’ll meet us when you get there
For that woman I would die
for that woman I would not live
You, my friend, through all the lies,
it is for you I wanna’ give
The bags are packed the sun is up there
gonna’ get to that place someday, somewhere

Roll the dice, walk the line
kiss it all goodbye

We’ll get there if we have to march
on a road of bones

Time’s gone by and nothing’s changed
and this feeling’s only grown
For my sins how much should I atone?
This town’s been dead since we were born

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One From the Heart-Bev Haven

In Uncategorized on December 5, 2013 at 2:03 pm

Punk’s not dead, it just sucks now.
-Grafitti in the Men’s Room at the 9:30 Club, Washington D.C.

Punk IS dead but, whaddiyagonnado? Rock&Roll can never die and this cut from my OG Homeboy is phenomenal. Check it:
And I could crush you to dust
with the thrust of my arms
through the void of your loss
Yeah, it’s that good. Last time I was in Philly, Bev Haven gave me a copy of “The Mysticism of Sound&Music-The Sufi Teachings of Hazrat Inayat Khan” but the best part was his inscription:
GOD IS LOVE. JESUS IS CORP.  Word.

Let this jam be a salve to your blue&bruised heart throughout the Loveless Winter in America.  And come out to Melodies Cafe in Ardmore next week to see me, Bev Haven and an all-star lineup perform.

 

Acoustic Stateshow
an evening of Singer-Songwriters
with
Jim Trainer
Bev Haven
Mark Thousands
Saturday December 14, 2013
at Melodie’s Cafe
2 E Lancaster Ave.
Ardmore, PA 19003
8pm

For more information visit the events page on Facebook.

ACOUSTIC STATE SHOW

Who Will Judge the Righteous? PT II-Introducing Guest Blogger Don Bajema

In Uncategorized on September 10, 2013 at 11:23 am

PT II
violence is all around me
still my city sleeps
fallin through the curtains
I see nations crumble for me
Horizon Lion, Bev Haven

Who will judge the righteous?
It ain’t me, Brother.  That would take tenacity and wisdom.  It would take the strength of conviction, knowing what’s right and not giving an inch.  It would take what those young men do out on the field every day of the NFL Season, but coupled with the guidance of a crack playcoach whose cool&disaffected exterior only masks a keen&calculating hunger for victory.

Novelist, screenwriter, actor and spoken-word performer Don Bajema’s been there.  The former world-class athlete not only played for the St. Louis Cardinals, he’s toured Europe as a spoken word poet beside Henry Rollins and Hubert Selby Jr. no less.
There is a beautiful and searing clarity in his work.
Winged Shoes and a Shield, released last fall, offers a view of Sunrise in America that is both sweeping and penetrating.  Panoramic views of seemingly idyllic youth growing up in the 50s and 60s are presented in tandem with the malignant undercurrent of the draft and specter of the Vietnam War.  It’s not lost on Bajema that many of protagonist Eddie Burnett’s peers were using their young&naïve prowess to destroy villages of civilians in jungles far away from the track and field where Eddie excelled or the beaches south of San Diego where he fell in love.  Or worse, like Eddie many were suffering right here at home at the yoke of violent fathers who never really came home from their War years before, if only as shells of men, bitter and beaten.

I like Bajema’s America.  Maybe even better than the real one.  The man certainly offers a more authentic view of the “greatest country in the world” than the one that’s advertised.  Bajema’s America is at once hopefully idealistic and savagely dark.  It’s no accident that I hear rock&roll when I read Don Bajema.  It has as much to do with his paens to rock music’s innocence&potency as the dangerous world his characters live but dare to be in love in.

Aho.  My respect for him goes beyond acknowledging that he was there for that sublime and golden burgeoning of the middleclass and introduction of leisure such as the NFL to the gen pop.   Brother Don has kept his eyes open.  I’ve written it before, the man has remained beautifully awake.  He’s watched the whole thing come tumbling down.
He’s witnessed the murder of a dream and seen the promise of the hippie generation all but rot while a backlash rolled this country back 30 years and stalled our history sometime around 1989 and somewhere between willfully ignorant and grossly apathetic.

But, what do I know?  I’m just an apathetic ex-Pat postpunkrocker who admittedly sometimes just wants to flush it all down and watch it sink utterly into slothful oblivion.  I know, a bit much, eh Brother?  A little dark.  That’s why people like Don Bajema are important.  He’s wont to check me on Facebook sometimes, when I’m on some nihilistic, anti-Christian anti-American jag.  He never tells me I’m wrong but he doesn’t have to.  I can’t help but hear light and love coming from the voice of a man who’s been there, seen it come down, but somehow still believes.  The man is a true patriot and as close to a hero as you can get these days, when leaders and pundits and the big business of news reporting are all so busy telling you who to hate and what to fear.
Brother Don ain’t goin’ in for that bullshit, brother.  He knows that we won’t get fooled again, even if he needs to remind an unemployed and apolitical journalist like me sometimes.

Stay tuned for the first three chapters of Don Bajema’s newest work Too Skinny, Too Small, to be run serially on Going for the Throat over the next couple of weeks.  Order your copy of Winged Shoes and a Shield from City Lights Booksellers.

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